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Hydrate samples and field activities from Lake Baikal

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A gas hydrate sample from Lake Baikal displaying some of the textures present at this site. Photo courtesy of: O. Khlystov Split sediment core with visible hydrates. Photo courtesy of: University of Ghent. Splitting open the sediment core. Photo courtesy of: University of Ghent. Cutting through the ice covering Lake Baikal. Photo courtesy of: University of Ghent. A split sediment core with visible hydrates. Photo courtesy of: University of Ghent. Ice cover on Lake Baikal. Photo courtesy of: University of Ghent. Field work conditions on Lake Baikal during Winter. Photo courtesy of: University of Ghent. A sediment core that has been set alight. Photo courtesy of: O. Khlystov Taking a closer look at a sample. Photo courtesy of: O. Khlystov Small hydrate samples. Photo courtesy of: O. Khlystov Thin veins in the sediment core. Photo courtesy of: O. Khlystov

Here in Russia is Lake Baikal, the only freshwater basin in the World with proven gas hydrate presence, where scientists have discovered huge hills of the ice-like solid on the floor of the Lake. The deepest point of the lake is 1,680 meters and it it is estimated that over 1 trillion cubic meters of natural gas exist here, trapped below the surface of the water. Come see first hand the activities of scientists looking at freshwater methane gas hydrates.