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Book 1: Methane gas hydrates in nature

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Looking out from Alvin submersible at near surface hydrates at Hydrate Ridge. Photo courtesy of Scientific Party, RV Atlantis/Alvin Expedition: NSF/Dorv II (2006). Bubbles frozen in the ice at Lake Baikal.  Photo courtesy of:  University of Ghent. Gas bubbles coming to the ocean surface.  Photo courtesy of: IFM-GEOMAR Massive methane hydrate formed beneath a carbonate ledge (top) overhanging a seafloor cold seep on the Blake Ridge Diapir. Such formations of massive hydrates are unusual and are not representative of overall occurrence types. Photo courtesy WHOI/USGS. Near surface hydrates photographed during an Alvin dive, Hydrate Ridge. Scientific Party, RV Atlantis/Alvin Expedition: NSF/Dorv II (2006). Close-up of an ice-worm that feeds on methantropic bacteria associated with gas hydrates occurrences in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo courtesy of: Charles Fisher, Penn State (image)  This close-up photo shows a dense colony of one-to-two inch-long polychaete worms living on and in the surface of the methane hydrate. Photo courtesy of: Charles Fisher, Penn State. Text courtesy of: Penn State (image)  Methane hydrates are mounds of ice (crystallized structures of methane & water) that can form under conditions of low temperature and high pressure. Photo courtesy of: Charles Fisher, Penn State. Text courtesy of: Penn State (image)

Methane gas hydrates occur in a number of locations around the world. Geologically, methane gas hydrates are found both in oceanic/lacustrine and permafrost environments. This gallery presents a glimpse of methane gas hydrates in their natural setting.