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Kasumi Fuji of JOGMEC describes monitoring techniques used during exploration and production testing of gas hydrates. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada. Disassociated gas hydrates in the water column at Hydrate Ridge. Video courtesy of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). What are methane gas hydrates? Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Scott Dallimore of Natural Resources Canada discusses the state of the art in technology and provides an explanation of the breakthrough research on methane gas hydrates at the Mallik Site. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada. Where do methane gas hydrates occur? A short visual presentation of the locations of hydrate sites around the World. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Research began on the Mallik drill site¨with team members from 5 countries in 1998. The result is record-breaking production testing and successful extraction of methane gas from hydrates. Hear more from Scott Dallimore of Natural Resources Canada. How does the natural environment at the Mallik site effect drilling? Scott Dallimore of Natural Resources Canada explains the process of drilling down to a depth of 900-1100 m through 600 m permafrost. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada. A short clip about accessing the Mallik site in winter, narrated by Scott Dallimore of Natural Resources Canada. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada. Scott Dallimore of Natural Resources Canada describes the unique environment of the Mackenzie Delta. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada. The 2008 Mallik production testing produced an output of 13,000 cubic meters of natural gas. Find out more about this second winter of testing here. Video courtesy of Geological Survey of Canada. Scott Dallimore of Natural Resources Canada describes the energy potential of methane gas hydrates. Video courtesy of the Geological Survey of Canada. Waters surrounding Japan are thought to host large amounts of natural gas in the form of hydrates. For a country relying almost completely on imported energy, this discovery of national importance. Video courtesy of JOGMEC. Learn more about the permafrost environmental conditions and drilling process for hydrates in the Mackenzie Delta. Video courtesy of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Presentation by project leader Yannick Beaudoin: 7th International Conference on Gas Hydrates, 17-21 July, 2011. Discover more about the depressurization technique used in the production of methane hydrate at the Mallik Well in 2007 and 2008. Video courtesy of JOGMEC. In 2002, MBARI conducted controlled experiments on the fate of natural hydrates which are disturbed from the sea floor, at a depth of 780 m by a ROV (remotely operated vehicle). Video courtesy of Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). A CBC News report about cooperation at the Mallik site between the Aurora Research Institute, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and a team of international scientists. Video courtesy of: The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Find out more about the challenges and successes of the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Research Well Program in this chronicle. Video courtesy of the Japan Natinal Oil Corporation and the Geological Survey of Canada. A feature report entitled 'Land of Fire', which explores methane gas hydrates in the Canadian Arctic. Video courtesy of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
A selection of videos and media documentaries related to methane gas hydrate research.